Transition, Trauma, Culture Shock, and Crisis

Some people believe that when they make life changes or interact with other cultures that they are unaffected. Others think that they are self- aware and can get through any change or challenge unscathed.  The research begs to differ with this idea.  Do a simple search on any major academic search engine, and you will find thousands of articles dedicated to trauma, culture shock, and crisis.   When changing environments, whether they simply be cities, workplaces, or more complex challenges like families and countries,  it’s vital to remember that you and those who are close to you will go through changes during these periods of transition and culture shock. These changes may even alter your worldview.

Richey (2015) had a very helpful article on culture shock in 2015, which we have included in the reference section below.  It also includes a wonderful visual on culture-shock/transition that we are reproducing here. Most people would only think of this map when it comes to the death of a loved one or other major crisis, but it does apply to culture-shock and transition.

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When diverse cultures interact closely with one another, there are bound to be miscommunications and confusions, which can lead to losing confidence and crises.  It’s important for workplaces to be aware of those culture shocks, transitions, and problems, and work towards ethical solutions that are culturally sensitive.  This week, we will probably do our research post on this topic so you can read more.

It’s important for all employers to learn about cultural transitions and work with their employees to ensure their well-being.

©Allison J. Weaver Consulting, LLC 2017

Reference:

Richey, M. (2015, June 22). Jet Program Culture Shock. Retrieved April 18, 2017, from https://www.tofugu.com/japan/culture-shock-in-japan-on-the-jet-program/

 

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2 thoughts on “Transition, Trauma, Culture Shock, and Crisis

  1. Thank you for an enlightening post. As an ATCK, these sorts of visuals help me to figure out where I am at in the repatriation / reverse culture shock process, and allows me to cope in healthy ways. This is also a very important and useful tool in the realm of business in which you spoke of in your post.

    Like

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