FAQ’s About Us

Dear Readers,
Today we thought we’d address some common FAQ’s about us. For more information, please visit our website: http://www.allisonjweaver.consulting/

Here are some answers below:

How Do Your Sessions Work?
A. Our Approach

1. Our approach is primarily an alliance between the coach/consultant and the Client in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires the client to maximize personal and professional potential.
2. We value aspects of both coaching, which involves the coach drawing out the client’s full potential and consulting, where the consultant brings expertise to the client’s situation.
3. Our coaching/consulting relationship is a partnership which:

Unlocks a potential to maximize performance.
Allows the client flexibility
Encourages Accountability
Helps clients learn by doing
Inspires creative thinking, growth, and strategies.
Provides structure, advice and guidance.

4. Finally, the “answers” that you are looking for come about through the work done in our joint partnership.

B. Quick Definitions for Your Consideration

1. Coaching: Coaching develops leadership, strategy, relationships and communication through facilitation, accountability, listening, and challenge.
2. Consulting: Giving expert advice, strategies, expertise, and experienced opinions to clients on decisions and situations of importance. Consultants are specialists in their field.
3. Counseling: Helping people resolve psychological or mental health problems, through licensed mental health counseling. We do not offer psychological or mental health counseling or therapy in our sessions?

What are the responsibilities of the Consultant/Coach and Client?

A. The Basics

1. Clarify and encourage you to set the goals that you really want.
2. Help you and your team focus better in order to produce results more quickly.
3. Provide you with the tools, support and structure to accomplish more of your goals.

B. The Coach’s Focus

1. The main focus is on helping each client navigate and enhance cross-cultural relationships, improve communication with peers and patients, and work towards reducing burnout and enhance well-being in their department.

C. Other Responsibilities of the Coach:

1. Ask questions, encourage, advise, challenge, make requests and listen.
2. Keep you on track with your goals, values and vision.
3. Value clarification, identifying plans of action, and examining modes of operating.
4. Giving feedback and empowering actions.
5. Provide and facilitate sessions.
6. Customize sessions to fit each client’s need.
7. Demonstrate 100% commitment to the process.

D. Responsibilities of the Client

1. Expect Your Best – Give Your Best Effort.
2. Be Willing to Change and Take Action.
3. Be Open to Feedback.
4. Do the Required Homework.
5. Let Your Coach Know How You Feel About the Process.
6. Be Committed and Focused.
7. Request Adjustments as Needed to Help Your Learning.
8. Understand That You Will Grow.
9. Be Willing to Step Up to Face the Challenge.
10. Come Prepared. Fill out the Coaching Preparation For

Where Can I Find a PDF Version of Your Forms, Policies and Contract?
A version of our contract, terms, and policies are available for download here

Will coaching really help my team?

Check out this helpful article from the Harvard Business Review for more information: https://hbr.org/2015/04/will-that-cross-cultural-coach-really-help-your-team .

More about us: http://www.allisonjweaver.consulting/learn-more

A Few Things of Interest: A Weekly Roundup: Topic = Physician/Surgeon Suicide

Since we couldn’t post recently, we’ll post one longer post now.

Weekly Roundup: Physician Suicide (in order of publication)

MacDonald, H. (2017). Crossing the Rubicon: Death in ‘The Year of the Transplant’. Medical history, 61(1), 107-127.
Rothenberger, D. A. (2017). Physician Burnout and Well-Being: A Systematic Review and Framework for Action. Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, 60(6), 567-576.
Currie, J., & MacLeod, W. B. (2017). Diagnosing expertise: Human capital, decision making, and performance among physicians. Journal of Labor Economics, 35(1), 1-43.
Shanafelt, T. D., & Noseworthy, J. H. (2017, January). Executive leadership and physician well-being: nine organizational strategies to promote engagement and reduce burnout. In Mayo Clinic Proceedings (Vol. 92, No. 1, pp. 129-146). Elsevier.
Kuhn, C. M., & Flanagan, E. M. (2017). Self-care as a professional imperative: physician burnout, depression, and suicide. Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d’anesthésie, 64(2), 158-168.
Damasceno, K. S., de Sousa Barbosa, É., Pimentel, J. V. C., Júnior, A. G. T., de Meneses, A. C. P., Júnior, J. G., … & Biruel, E. P. (2017). Suicide among Physicians and Methodological Similarities of MEDLINE/PubMED and BVS/BIREME Open Access Bibliographic Databases: A Systematic Review with Metanalysis. Health, 9(02), 352.
Ho, C., Siegfried, J., Remo, K., & Laskin, J. (2017). P1. 05-060 Adherence to Surveillance Guidelines in Resected NSCLC: Physician Compliance and Impact on Outcomes. Journal of Thoracic Oncology, 12(1), S651-S652.
Shorter, E. (2017). Doctors and their patients: A social history. Routledge.
Stain, S. C., & Farquhar, M. (2017). Should doctors work 24 hour shifts?. BMJ, 358, j3522.

Media

Dr. Pamela Wible

Our apologies for the low quality video.

Here’s another helpful  video by Dr. Wible:

Tools / Tips

What to do when your coworker tells you that they are suicidal:

  1. If the situation is serious, call 911  (or  the emergency number in your country). If you aren’t comfortable with that, or at least the Suicide Prevention Lifeline: tel:1-800-273-8255:  More information here: http://www.sprc.org/resources-programs/role-co-workers-preventing-suicide-sprc-customized-information-series
  2.  Do some research. Here are some examples:

3. Check in with the person, and invite them to have a conversation. Make some excuse to engage them.

4. Don’t ignore signs of trouble and assume HR will intervene.  Research whether your workplace has an employee assistance program. Some people with depression feel too emotionally exhausted to take these kinds of steps to help themselves, so just doing this can help them immensely.

5. A goal oriented approach often helps more than a problem-based approach, when helping people overcome depression.

6. Call your Employee Assistance Plan (EAP) phone number for advice.

These are only a few ways to help. We recommend that you research other ways to help and seek expert guidance as needed.

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Something Worth Reposting…

I stumbled on this quote from Clive Thompson. It captures what I face as a thinking, writing, tweeting health professional: “Knowing when to shift between public and private thinking—when to blast an idea online, when to let it slow bake—is a crucial new skill: cognitive diversity.”– Clive Thompson Our ability to write, record and send…

via Cognitive Diversity – When to Share — 33 Charts

A Few Interesting Blogs for the Week

Here are a few links to some interesting blogs for your reading pleasure.

kottke.org: http://kottke.org/17/07/the-subtle-art-of-not-giving-a-fck

Medscape Medical News Headlines http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/883545?src=rss

Culture Shock: When Your Soul Takes Longer to Arrive

carolinegourlay https://carolinegourlay.wordpress.com/2017/06/28/six-pitfalls-of-family-business-leadership/90

Business Psychology: https://businessofbusiness.blog/2017/05/27/the-entrepreneurs-wound/

Xclusive Fitness: https://xclusivefitnessstudio.wordpress.com/2017/07/20/all-change-must-start-from-within/

Kurts Adams http://kurtsadams.com/2017/07/09/why-little-details-are-most-important/

We could share many, many, more, but these caught our attention. Happy reading!

 

Thur Tools and Tips: Improving Cultural Competence

This week, we’ll be sharing a few tips on improving cultural competence.  This is a crucial part of our globalized workplaces, and a key for companies and individuals who what to stay on the cutting edge.  Here are a few tips:

  1. Recognize the worldview of the individuals around you. Culture is not limited to skin color, ethnicity or country. It is far deeper. Learn about the individuals and cultures represented in  your workplace. This will help your work team function most effectively.images
  2.  Get to know your patients’ cultures. Don’t assume you already know their cultures based on their last name or other prejudice. Optimize the short time you have with your patients to learn about them and complete the task at hand.
  3. Determine your cultural effectiveness.  How well do you understand culture and cross-cultural research? Do your homework and brush up on some of the latest research.  Look for strengths and weaknesses of your own worldview based on psychological and sociological studies.
  4. Make your patients feel “at home.” If possible, your staff should reflect your area’s cultural makeup and understand the cultures represented.
  5. Conduct culturally sensitive evaluations, and learn about your patients expectations and preferences.  Don’t treat cases like a factory worker treats a broken machine. Think of the human behind the physical ailment.
  6.   Be willing to learn by making mistakes. You won’t  be able to do it 100% perfectly all the time. Use failure as an opportunity for learning.
  7.  Attend conferences outside of your discipline once in a while to learn more about what’s happening in the arena of cross-cultural competence.
  8. Expand your horizons and interact with groups of people who are outside of your cultural or work bubble. Joining clubs can be a great way to do this if you have a little spare time.
  9.  Find out what resources your department has to help you learn more about other cultures and worldviews. Set aside some time for learning.

We guarantee if you take these steps, you will be on your way towards cross-cultural competence. These are not the only ways to develop cross-cultural competence, but they are a great start. Developing cross-cultural competence will help you avoid miscommunications  and misunderstandings that could be very costly.