12 Blog Roundup for the Week

This week’s blog roundup is short, but packed with interesting content. Feel free to check out these blogs.

-Enjoy Your Vacation (Really Enjoy It!)

2. KevinMD.com Good clinical care takes more than medical acumen

3.TEDMED Blog The Healing Power of Art

4. carolinegourlay -Passing the baton – a succession-planning guide

5. Kamila Fakhra Fahima, The Business Epiphany -The Psychology Behind Irrational Decision

6. Rory Quinn, The business of business blog  -The Entrepreneur’s Wound

7. Nino, Lead Utah -Connection is Required for Creation

8. stellanoel, notanothertckblog -Reverse culture shock

9. brainstorming101blog, Brainstorming 101-Testing times

10. Jennifer Huber, Scientists Talk Funny – New study intervenes to help female collegiate distance runners eat enough

11. Thomas, Colorado Center for Orthopaedic Excellence -What You Need to Know About Achilles Tendon Tear and Repair

12. Medicine by Alexandros G. Sfakianakis,Anapafseos 5 Agios Nikolaos 72100 Crete – The 7 C’s of Success: a Strong Confidence

 

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Media, Tools and Research: Topic: Worldviews

Today’s topic surrounds the concept of “Worldviews”. We define “Worldview” as the lens through which an individual sees the world.

Here’s one person advocating a fact based worldview:

For more interesting information on worldviews, feel free to read these articles:

Åhs, V., Poulter, S., & Kallioniemi, A. (2017). Preparing for the world of diverse worldviews: parental and school stakeholder views on integrative worldview education in a Finnish context. British Journal of Religious Education, 1-12.

Schwartz, L., & Belcher, C. (2017). Scholarly Praxis at the Edges: Why Responsible Academic Leadership Matters in Developing Faculty Scholarship. In Handbook of Research on Administration, Policy, and Leadership in Higher Education (pp. 46-62). IGI Global.

Bindlish, P., Joshi, A., Dutt, P., Verma, P., & Arora, S. (2017). Researcher Preparation for Indigenous Fundamental Research Through Collaborative Participation. In Implementing Communities of Practice in Higher Education (pp. 107-129). Springer Singapore.

Jeffreys, M. R., & Zoucha, R. (2017). THE INVISIBLE CULTURE OF THE MULTIRACIAL, MULTIETHNIC INDIVIDUAL: A TRANSCULTURAL IMPERATIVE (REPRINT FROM 2001). Journal of Cultural Diversity, 24(1).

Thurlow, A., Kushniryk, A., Yue, A. R., Blanchette, K., Murchland, P., & Simon, A. (2017). Evaluating excellence: A model of evaluation for public relations practice in organizational culture and context. Public Relations Review, 43(1), 71-79.

Francis, V. F. (2017). Infusing Dispute Resolution Teaching and Training with Culture and Diversity.

Worldview quote:

A worldview is a commitment, a fundamental orientation of the heart, that can be expressed as a story or in a set of presuppositions (assumptions which may be true, partially true or entirely false) which we hold (consciously or subconsciously, consistently or inconsistently) about the basic constitution of reality, and that provides the foundations on which we live and more and have our being.

worldview

FAQ’s About Us

Dear Readers,
Today we thought we’d address some common FAQ’s about us. For more information, please visit our website: http://www.allisonjweaver.consulting/

Here are some answers below:

How Do Your Sessions Work?
A. Our Approach

1. Our approach is primarily an alliance between the coach/consultant and the Client in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires the client to maximize personal and professional potential.
2. We value aspects of both coaching, which involves the coach drawing out the client’s full potential and consulting, where the consultant brings expertise to the client’s situation.
3. Our coaching/consulting relationship is a partnership which:

Unlocks a potential to maximize performance.
Allows the client flexibility
Encourages Accountability
Helps clients learn by doing
Inspires creative thinking, growth, and strategies.
Provides structure, advice and guidance.

4. Finally, the “answers” that you are looking for come about through the work done in our joint partnership.

B. Quick Definitions for Your Consideration

1. Coaching: Coaching develops leadership, strategy, relationships and communication through facilitation, accountability, listening, and challenge.
2. Consulting: Giving expert advice, strategies, expertise, and experienced opinions to clients on decisions and situations of importance. Consultants are specialists in their field.
3. Counseling: Helping people resolve psychological or mental health problems, through licensed mental health counseling. We do not offer psychological or mental health counseling or therapy in our sessions?

What are the responsibilities of the Consultant/Coach and Client?

A. The Basics

1. Clarify and encourage you to set the goals that you really want.
2. Help you and your team focus better in order to produce results more quickly.
3. Provide you with the tools, support and structure to accomplish more of your goals.

B. The Coach’s Focus

1. The main focus is on helping each client navigate and enhance cross-cultural relationships, improve communication with peers and patients, and work towards reducing burnout and enhance well-being in their department.

C. Other Responsibilities of the Coach:

1. Ask questions, encourage, advise, challenge, make requests and listen.
2. Keep you on track with your goals, values and vision.
3. Value clarification, identifying plans of action, and examining modes of operating.
4. Giving feedback and empowering actions.
5. Provide and facilitate sessions.
6. Customize sessions to fit each client’s need.
7. Demonstrate 100% commitment to the process.

D. Responsibilities of the Client

1. Expect Your Best – Give Your Best Effort.
2. Be Willing to Change and Take Action.
3. Be Open to Feedback.
4. Do the Required Homework.
5. Let Your Coach Know How You Feel About the Process.
6. Be Committed and Focused.
7. Request Adjustments as Needed to Help Your Learning.
8. Understand That You Will Grow.
9. Be Willing to Step Up to Face the Challenge.
10. Come Prepared. Fill out the Coaching Preparation For

Where Can I Find a PDF Version of Your Forms, Policies and Contract?
A version of our contract, terms, and policies are available for download here

Will coaching really help my team?

Check out this helpful article from the Harvard Business Review for more information: https://hbr.org/2015/04/will-that-cross-cultural-coach-really-help-your-team .

More about us: http://www.allisonjweaver.consulting/learn-more

A Few Interesting Blogs for the Week

Here are a few links to some interesting blogs for your reading pleasure.

kottke.org: http://kottke.org/17/07/the-subtle-art-of-not-giving-a-fck

Medscape Medical News Headlines http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/883545?src=rss

Culture Shock: When Your Soul Takes Longer to Arrive

carolinegourlay https://carolinegourlay.wordpress.com/2017/06/28/six-pitfalls-of-family-business-leadership/90

Business Psychology: https://businessofbusiness.blog/2017/05/27/the-entrepreneurs-wound/

Xclusive Fitness: https://xclusivefitnessstudio.wordpress.com/2017/07/20/all-change-must-start-from-within/

Kurts Adams http://kurtsadams.com/2017/07/09/why-little-details-are-most-important/

We could share many, many, more, but these caught our attention. Happy reading!

 

Thur Tools and Tips: Improving Cultural Competence

This week, we’ll be sharing a few tips on improving cultural competence.  This is a crucial part of our globalized workplaces, and a key for companies and individuals who what to stay on the cutting edge.  Here are a few tips:

  1. Recognize the worldview of the individuals around you. Culture is not limited to skin color, ethnicity or country. It is far deeper. Learn about the individuals and cultures represented in  your workplace. This will help your work team function most effectively.images
  2.  Get to know your patients’ cultures. Don’t assume you already know their cultures based on their last name or other prejudice. Optimize the short time you have with your patients to learn about them and complete the task at hand.
  3. Determine your cultural effectiveness.  How well do you understand culture and cross-cultural research? Do your homework and brush up on some of the latest research.  Look for strengths and weaknesses of your own worldview based on psychological and sociological studies.
  4. Make your patients feel “at home.” If possible, your staff should reflect your area’s cultural makeup and understand the cultures represented.
  5. Conduct culturally sensitive evaluations, and learn about your patients expectations and preferences.  Don’t treat cases like a factory worker treats a broken machine. Think of the human behind the physical ailment.
  6.   Be willing to learn by making mistakes. You won’t  be able to do it 100% perfectly all the time. Use failure as an opportunity for learning.
  7.  Attend conferences outside of your discipline once in a while to learn more about what’s happening in the arena of cross-cultural competence.
  8. Expand your horizons and interact with groups of people who are outside of your cultural or work bubble. Joining clubs can be a great way to do this if you have a little spare time.
  9.  Find out what resources your department has to help you learn more about other cultures and worldviews. Set aside some time for learning.

We guarantee if you take these steps, you will be on your way towards cross-cultural competence. These are not the only ways to develop cross-cultural competence, but they are a great start. Developing cross-cultural competence will help you avoid miscommunications  and misunderstandings that could be very costly.

Research: Culture

Here is some research on culture.  We hope that it you find it interesting. The research is listed by date.

Beugelsdijk, S., Kostova, T., & Roth, K. (2017). An overview of Hofstede-inspired country-level culture research in international business since 2006. Journal of International Business Studies, 48(1), 30-47.

Oyserman, D. (2017). Culture three ways: Culture and subcultures within countries. Annual review of psychology, 68, 435-463.

Lindblad, S., Ernestam, S., Van Citters, A. D., Lind, C., Morgan, T. S., & Nelson, E. C. (2017). Creating a culture of health: evolving healthcare systems and patient engagement. QJM: An International Journal of Medicine, 110(3), 125-129.

Ramdhani, A., Ramdhani, M. A., & Ainisyifa, H. (2017). Conceptual Framework of Corporate Culture Influenced on Employees Commitment to Organization. International Business Management11(3), 826-803.

Mears, D. P., Stewart, E. A., Warren, P. Y., & Simons, R. L. (2017). Culture and formal social control: The effect of the code of the street on police and court decision-making. Justice Quarterly34(2), 217-247.

Kangas, M., Muotka, J., Huhtala, M., Mäkikangas, A., & Feldt, T. (2017). Is the ethical culture of the organization associated with sickness absence? A multilevel analysis in a public sector organization. Journal of Business Ethics140(1), 131.

Ax, C., & Greve, J. (2017). Adoption of management accounting innovations: Organizational culture compatibility and perceived outcomes. Management Accounting Research34, 59-74.

Dubey, R., Gunasekaran, A., Helo, P., Papadopoulos, T., Childe, S. J., & Sahay, B. S. (2017). Explaining the impact of reconfigurable manufacturing systems on environmental performance: The role of top management and organizational culture. Journal of Cleaner Production141, 56-66.

Schneider, B., González-Romá, V., Ostroff, C., & West, M. A. (2017). Organizational Climate and Culture: Reflections on the History of the Constructs in JAP.

Stewart, P. J., & Strathern, A. J. (2017). Language and culture. In Breaking the Frames (pp. 69-78). Springer International Publishing.

Storey, M. A., Zagalsky, A., Figueira Filho, F., Singer, L., & German, D. M. (2017). How social and communication channels shape and challenge a participatory culture in software development. IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering43(2), 185-204.

Lizardo, O. (2017). Improving Cultural Analysis: Considering Personal Culture in its Declarative and Nondeclarative Modes. American Sociological Review82(1), 88-115.

Graham, J. R., Harvey, C. R., Popadak, J., & Rajgopal, S. (2017). Corporate culture: Evidence from the field (No. w23255). National Bureau of Economic Research.

Petitta, L., Probst, T. M., & Barbaranelli, C. (2017). Safety culture, moral disengagement, and accident underreporting. Journal of Business Ethics141(3), 489.

Bartikowski, B., & Cleveland, M. (2017). “Seeing is being”: Consumer culture and the positioning of premium cars in China. Journal of Business Research77, 195-202.

Meddings, J., Reichert, H., Greene, M. T., Safdar, N., Krein, S. L., Olmsted, R. N., … & Saint, S. (2017). Evaluation of the association between Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures and catheter-associated infections: results of two national collaboratives. BMJ Qual Saf26(3), 226-235.

Lamberti, A. P., & Richards, A. R. (Eds.). (2017). Complex worlds: digital culture, rhetoric and professional communication. Routledge.

Franklin, A. (2017, January). The role of culture and language in the development of color categorization. In Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology: Culture and Developmental Systems, Volume 38 (pp. 39-81). John Wiley & Sons, Inc..

Griffith, C. J., Griffith, C. J., Jackson, L. M., Jackson, L. M., Lues, R., & Lues, R. (2017). The food safety culture in a large South African food service complex: Perspectives on a case study. British Food Journal119(4), 729-743.

Truong, T. D., Hallinger, P., & Sanga, K. (2017). Confucian values and school leadership in Vietnam: Exploring the influence of culture on principal decision making. Educational Management Administration & Leadership45(1), 77-100.

Wang, M., Rieger, M. O., & Hens, T. (2017). The impact of culture on loss aversion. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making30(2), 270-281.

Dobia, B., & Roffey, S. (2017). Respect for Culture—Social and Emotional Learning with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth. In Social and Emotional Learning in Australia and the Asia-Pacific (pp. 313-334). Springer Singapore.

Chan, A., Clegg, S., & Warr, M. (2017). Translating Intervention: When Corporate Culture Meets Chinese Socialism. Journal of Management Inquiry, 1056492617696888.

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Thoughts on Changes in Healthcare

The healthcare industry in the United States of America is undergoing many changes. As a result, people wonder if their health benefits will stay the same, or how they will be impacted negatively.  Even the wealthy with many assets and investments are facing the potential of more of their income going towards healthcare expenses.  As we have seen with the housing market, there will come a point where the bubble is forced to pop. In other words, the empire of healthcare that has been so lucrative to some is bound to falter.

Even in the best case scenario,  the USA  has a long way to go to compare to the standard of healthcare in places like France, Sweden, Japan and a host of other countries. While the USA is a leader in innovation and research, it has failed miserably in terms of affordable care. On top of that, the USA is a huge tourist destination for healthcare and has assisted many internationals looking for advanced treatment. As such, the market has become more diverse. Similarly, as the physician shortage gets worse in the country, people are being recruited from all over the world to fill in the gaps.

The downside to all of this is that changes are coming too quickly. Decision makers are struggling to keep up with the cross-cultural changes in healthcare, in addition to the other demands faced by the changing system.  There are few things in place in most contexts to prevent Physician burnout and improve cross-cultural awareness.  This has caused various problems in terms of efficiency of communication between medical professionals and their patients, and even malpractice suits.

While the situation is complicated, it’s not unsolvable.  If the USA wants to continue to be a world leader, there needs to be a huge overhaul of the system. As we have seen with the recent debates in healthcare, there are many values and worldviews in play. It will take more than a political measure to change the healthcare system in the USA.  It will take a collaborative effort from all spheres and socioeconomic sectors of society to improve healthcare for all. If one culture or group does not have a voice, the solution may come more slowly.  Our world is not a utopia. However,  we believe that it is part of the responsibility of those with influence to use their power and position to empower and educate those that do not have a voice.   In addition, those without a voice should not feel entitled or rely too much on those in power, but take initiatives to use the limited resources they have to bring about positive changes for their communities.