Research Tuesday: Culture Edition

This week’s research roundup has to do with culture. This is an interdisciplinary list. We trust that you will find these articles of some use and inspiration. NOTE: All articles listed are available on the websites of the journals listed, and some are in the public domain.
1.Becker, J. C., Kraus, M. W., & Rheinschmidt-Same, M. (2017). Cultural Expressions of Social Class and Their Implications for Group-Related Beliefs and Behaviors. Journal of Social Issues, 73(1), 158-174. doi:10.1111/josi.12209

2.Beecher, B., & Streitwieser, B. (2017). A Risk Management Approach for the Internationalization of Higher Education. Journal of the Knowledge Economy. doi:10.1007/s13132-017-0468-y

3.Bratianu, C., & Bejinaru, R. (2016). Evaluation of Knowledge Processes Within the Learning Organization. Challenges, Performances and Tendencies in Organisation Management, 125-135. doi:10.1142/9789814656023_0014

4.Katerattanakul, P., Hong, S., Lee, H., & Kam, H. (2017). The effects of web accessibility certification on the perception of companies’ corporate social responsibility. Universal Access in the Information Society. doi:10.1007/s10209-017-0532-1

5.Laskovaia, A., Shirokova, G., & Morris, M. H. (2017). National culture, effectuation, and new venture performance: global evidence from student entrepreneurs. Small Business Economics. doi:10.1007/s11187-017-9852-z

6.Lundin, R. M., Bashir, K., Bullock, A., Kostov, C. E., Mattick, K. L., Rees, C. E., & Monrouxe, L. V. (2017). “I’d been like freaking out the whole night”: exploring emotion regulation based on junior doctors’ narratives. Advances in Health Sciences Education. doi:10.1007/s10459-017-9769-y

7. Lungu, C. I., Caraiani, C., & Dascalu, C. (n.d.). Sustainable Intellectual Capital. Intellectual Capital Strategy Management for Knowledge-Based Organizations, 156-173. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-3655-2.ch009

8. Moya, M., & Fiske, S. T. (2017). The Social Psychology of the Great Recession and Social Class Divides. Journal of Social Issues, 73(1), 8-22. doi:10.1111/josi.12201

9.Rambo, L. R. (2017). Exploring Cultural Psychology: Introduction to a Book Forum on Towards Cultural Psychology of Religion: Principles, Approaches, Applications by Jacob A. Belzen. Pastoral Psychology. doi:10.1007/s11089-017-0765-1

10.Sengupta, N. K., Greaves, L. M., Osborne, D., & Sibley, C. G. (2017). The sigh of the oppressed: The palliative effects of ideology are stronger for people living in highly unequal neighbourhoods. British Journal of Social Psychology. doi:10.1111/bjso.12192

11.Sun, H. (2017). Business innovation and disruption in the music industry. Information, Communication & Society, 1-5. doi:10.1080/1369118x.2017.1301525

12. Vale, J., Branco, M. C., & Ribeiro, J. (2016). Individual intellectual capital versus collective intellectual capital in a meta-organization. Journal of Intellectual Capital, 17(2), 279-297. doi:10.1108/jic-05-2015-0044

©Allison J. Weaver Consulting, LLC 2017

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Weekly Blog Roundup: Ep. 3

Welcome to the weekly blog roundup!  We hope that you have had a lovely week so far. Here are a few interesting blogs from the blogosphere this week:
1. ACGME: Clinically-Driven Standards
2. Dr. Dahlia: 24-hour Medical Intern Shift Reinstated 3.
4. Science Life:  Watch a neuroscientist explain one concept at 5 levels of difficulty
5.  Latest Science News: The hazards of English spelling
6. Medscape: Stimulants Enhance Cognitive Performance in Top Chess Players
7. Engaget: Airbnb might soon be legal in Japan
8. A Country Doctor:  EMRs are Dangerous: Let’s Change That
9. Dan Hodge: Creating a culture
10. K Brent Tomer:  Pink Floyd’s rock opera, as opera
12. Hours and Miles: Work, Culture, and Workplace Culture
13. Felipe Lima: Dois Dedos de Música com Antony Left
14. Embracing the diversity: Starting from the beginning. Bilingualism? It’s not easy.
15.Alien at Home : “TCKs in Transition”

©Allison J. Weaver Consulting, LLC 2017

Weekly Blog Roundup Ep. 2

Here are some of the most intriguing blogs from across the internet that we found this week. Enjoy! Blog perspectives listed here are not necessarily representative of our company’s viewpoints.
1. Musings of a Psych Geek: Occupational Psychology: So what exactly do you do???
2. Ariska Aditiara: CCU1
3. The Atlantic Monthly: The Internet’s Impact on Creativity: Your Thoughts
4. WEB MD: Excercise Addiction in  Men
5.  Ain’t Mine No More: 5 Lessons I’ve Learned From Connection Groups 
6. Ash James, Health and Exercise Medicine: A Day in the Life of… 
7. CraseFit: Goal Oriented Focus
8. J.S. Park: Note to self: How to Apologize 
9. Phil Heft: Changing A Company’s Culture
10. Bohemian Nation: Make A Space for Yourself
11.HayleyBrownsite: What’s Your Self-talk Like?
12. Dominic Sorace: The Neurology of Ambiguity
13. Wordsummit: Bruce Lee on the ‘Hard Part’ of Learning Language
14. Truth is Nature: True Strength
15.  KATRINA ANGELICAN – How can One be a Doctor and Still be Himself? 
16. Tiago Silva, Tales from the 1974 Lakes – The Finnish Social and Healthcare Reform
17. Su, Footprints of Burma-  Burmese Dinner Table
18.  Lillian Lee- Enjoy  the Best Cup of English Tea
19. Peter Coffaro:  A Digital Revolution in Healthcare is Speeding Up
20. Alliance health Company: Prevent Workplace Injuries

Do you have more that you’d like to share with everyone? Feel free to comment below. 

©Allison J. Weaver Consulting, LLC 2017

Thoughts on Self-Mastery

The happiness of a man in this life does not consist in the absence but in the mastery of his passions. – Alfred Lord Tennyson

Self- Mastery, also known as temperance or self-control is a subject that is not commonly talked about unless someone is clearly out of control…

Let’s take it from the definition:

The original 1828 version of Webster’s Dictionary, states the definition of Temperance like this:

Temperance
TEMPERANCE, noun [Latin temperantia, from tempero.]

1. Moderation; particularly, habitual moderation in regard to the indulgence of the natural appetites and passions; restrained or moderate indulgence; as temperance in eating and drinking; temperance in the indulgence of joy or mirth. temperance in eating and drinking is opposed to gluttony and drunkenness, and in other indulgences, to excess. 

2. Patience; calmness; sedateness; moderation of passion.

The most recent definition in the modern Webster’s Dictionary says:

1. Moderation in action thought, or feeling: restraint
a. Habitual moderation in the indulgence of the appetites or passions
b. moderation in or abstinence from the use of alcoholic beverages

The definition has clearly changed a bit over time. The original definition implies balance in every sense, but the second seems a little more restrictive and practice oriented. In this article, we define “Temperance” more in line with the earlier definition. In this sense, the person isn’t overindulging or ‘gorging’ if you will on any one thing. In fact, a person who has a good grasp on the principle of ‘self-mastery’ is the person has a very balanced life.

In order to be a ‘master’ of yourself, you need to have good discipline, work ethic and organisation, but you also must control your thoughts and emotions. Even too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. Also, every action in business or any other arena has a consequence. For example, if a person comes into a large inheritance without having someone to help manage the wealth and understand good financial principals, that person will manage their wealth poorly.

In the modern Western world, patience is NOT valued. In fact, people prefer instant gratification and instant results to slow and steady growth. However, this ‘fast food’ mentality leads to many pitfalls, especially when people become entitled and addicted to convenience and quick solutions. Creativity and innovation take time and effort, and few hasty decisions lead to positive ends.

Self-control and temperance are excellent leadership skills and can lead to improved care for patients, team members and clients. A calm, patient, emotionally stable employee, administrator, or caregiver makes fewer mistakes and often has more compassion for their patients and co-workers. There are a variety of ways to improve self-mastery on the physical and emotional level.

A few ways to have more self-mastery are controlled eating, exercise, meditation, and taking the time to think through problems before acting. There are more advanced ways to have self- mastery, but we will have to save that for another article. In summary, the temperate person leads a balanced life, and is able to control his/her responses to life’s challenges and circumstances.

©Allison J. Weaver Consulting, LLC 2017